Anna Yoakum Bradenton FL

Anna Yoakum, 3210 42nd St E, Bradenton FL 34208  registered to vote on 01/28/1993 and is affiliated with the No Party AffiliationAnna Maria Yoakum is a White - Non Hispanic Female and is registered to vote in Manatee County, Florida.

Why Voting is Important

Make your voice heard...Every Vote Counts!

The Importance of Voting

Voting is one of the most important rights and responsibilities that U.S. citizens have. About 150 million American citizens are qualified to vote. Unfortunately, many don’t. They give up on a chance to choose leaders and representatives who will do things that are important to them.

Why Vote?

Nobody can force a citizen to vote. But many citizens do vote, because voting lets them tell the government what they want it to do. If citizens think they’re paying too many taxes, they can vote for a person who promises to lower taxes. If citizens want more services, they can vote for someone who will promise to spend funds to gain more services.

Every Vote Counts

It’s also important for citizens to know how to work the voting machines or to mark the ballots they’ll be using when they vote, so that their votes will be counted. Why is that so important? Because every vote counts! An election might be decided by a single vote and history would be changed because a person got…or lost…that one vote!

Political Parties Registered in Florida as of March, 2017

  • American’s Party of Florida
  • Constitution Party of Florida
  • Florida Democratic Party
  • Ecology Party of Florida
  • Green Party of Florida
  • Independence Party of Florida
  • Libertarian Party of Florida
  • Party for Socialism and Liberation - Florida
  • Reform Party of Florida
  • Republican Party of Florida

Overview of Anna Maria Yoakum:

NAME & ADDRESS: Anna Yoakum, 3210 42nd St E, Bradenton FL 34208

VOTER ID: 105326136

GENDER: Female

RACE: White - Non Hispanic

DATE OF BIRTH: 12/18/1945

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POLITICAL AFFILIATION: No Party Affiliation

REGISTRATION DATE: 01/28/1993

PRECINCT: 217

PRECINCT GROUP: 0

PRECINCT SPLIT: 217.3

VOTER STATUS: ACT

CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT: 16

HOUSE DISTRICT: 73

SENATE DISTRICT: 21

SCHOOL BOARD DISTRICT: 2

COUNTY DISTRICT: 2

Property Details

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Anna Yoakum, 3210 42nd St E, Bradenton FL 34208

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Possible Relatives

NAME
Anna Yoakum, 3210 42nd St E, Bradenton FL 34208
John Yoakum, 3210 42nd St E, Bradenton FL 34208

Possible Neighbors

NAME
Jason Howard, 3112 42nd St E, Bradenton FL 34208
Lisa Jamison, 3304 42nd St E, Bradenton FL 34208
Allan Kaufman, 2203 42nd St E, Bradenton FL 34208
Martha Kaufman, 2203 42nd St E, Bradenton FL 34208
Vicki Kaufman, 2203 42nd St E, Bradenton FL 34208
Rebecca Lemery, 2901 42nd St E, Bradenton FL 34208
Traci Sweet, 3007 42nd St E, Bradenton FL 34208
Linda Volino, 3117 42nd St E, Bradenton FL 34208
Micheal Volino, 3117 42nd St E, Bradenton FL 34208
Douglas Williams, 3112 42nd St E, Bradenton FL 34208
Cody Wolfe, 3007 42nd St E, Bradenton FL 34208
Misty Wolfe, 3007 42nd St E, Bradenton FL 34208
Tammie Wolfe, 3007 42nd St E, Bradenton FL 34208
Anna Yoakum, 3210 42nd St E, Bradenton FL 34208
John Yoakum, 3210 42nd St E, Bradenton FL 34208
Edward Egloff, 3304 42nd St E, Bradenton FL 34208
Adela Frye, 2305 42nd St E, Bradenton FL 34208
Gloria Green, 2806 42nd St E, Bradenton FL 34208
Kenneth Green, 2806 42nd St E, Bradenton FL 34208
Edda Ritchey, 2417 42nd St E, Bradenton FL 34208

Some Facts about the Voting Rights Act of 1965

The Voting Rights Act, signed into law by President Lyndon Johnson (1908-73) on August 6, 1965, aimed to overcome legal barriers at the state and local levels that prevented African Americans from exercising their right to vote under the 15th Amendment (1870) to the Constitution of the United States. The act significantly widened the franchise and is considered among the most far-reaching pieces of civil rights legislation in U.S. history.

The following are some facts about the Voting Rights Act of 1965:

The Voting Rights Act traces back to the Civil War

After the Civil War, in order to protect the voting rights of newly freed slaves the 14th and the 15th Amendments were passed. But - a century after the end of the Civil War, African-American citizens' voting rights were still being circumvented! In fact, the Jim Crow laws prevented African-Americans from voting by inflicting literacy tests, poll taxes, property ownership requirements, moral character tests, document interpretation tests and ancestral barriers.

The Act was set into motion in Selma, Alabama

A group of African-Americans marched into Selma, Alabama on March 7, 1965. They were peacefully protesting voter suppression but the marchers were attacked by state troopers in what has become known as "Bloody Sunday." Because of this series of events, congress was prompted to draw up the Voting Rights Act, which President Johnson then signed into law only 5 days after the bill was introduced. Historians believe that along with the Civil Rights Act, the Voting Rights Act was one of the most expansive pieces of civil rights legislation in American history.

Other minorities were also included

Although the Act was directly related to African-Americans, other minorities also shared in its provisions. In 1975, "American Indians, Asian Americans, Alaskan Natives or people of Spanish heritage" were included.

Revisions

There have been 3 significant revisions ot the original legislation. In 1975, the Voting Rights Act was amended to include provisions requiring voting materials be made available to minorities who were eligible to vote, but for whom English was not their primary language. A second amendment to the act was added in 1982, providing voting assistance to voters who were blind, disabled or illiterate. Then, in 2013 in a 5 to 4 vote, it was ruled that Section 5 was unconstitutional.

There is still controversy today

When Section 5 was declared to be unconstitutional in 2013, many minorities and support groups were outraged. Then, in the meantime a new controversy has arisen with the requirement that certain states make voters present a valid photo ID in order to vote.

Those who agree with the measure claim that it is a check against voter fraud, while those against it claim such measures infringe on voters rights. Learn more about voter rights and the history of voting rights.